BOOKER ENGLISH

Resources, best practices, cool ideas

REVIEW FUSE

REVIEW FUSE

April 12, 2010 Posted by | WRITING | , , | Leave a comment

CROCODOC

February 28, 2010 Posted by | TECH TOOLS, WRITING | , | Leave a comment

LIGHTNING BUG

February 20, 2010 Posted by | WRITING | , | Leave a comment

ELABORATION IN PARAGRAPHS

December 21, 2009 Posted by | POWERPOINT, WRITING | , | Leave a comment

AWARD WINNING BLOG

Using One Book for Many Purposes

Posted on Thursday December 17, 2009 by Stacey



Read to the end of the post for ideas on “reading like a writer.”

When I started teaching I owned a handful of picture and chapter books.  I came armed with this handful and my love for Judy Blume.  I knew I liked to write, but really had no idea how to help a child become a stronger writer.  Over time, with a lot of guidance and professional development, I learned more about children’s books and became more adept at teaching writing.

One of the many things I learned along the way was that you can use one book for many purposes.   While it might seem helpful to have lots of books at your fingertips, to teach from, having a few, well-crafted texts you know really well also works.  Last year, there were a few texts I used for Interactive Read Aloud and as mentor texts for Writing Workshop.  While it may seem like overkill to keep coming back to the same text again and again, it’s really helpful for kids to learn how to write better from a book they have discussed in-depth with their peers.

When I took Lucy Calkins’s Course on reading-writing connections at the Summer 2008 TCRWP Writing Institute, our class spent a week dissecting Hurricane so we could use it as a teaching tool.  By the week’s end, everyone in the course worked on describing craft moves we noticed the author of Hurricane make that we could teach to a student.  We followed Lucy’s advice, when we did this, which was:

READ THE REST OF THE POST HERE

December 21, 2009 Posted by | WRITING | , , , | Leave a comment

SUMMARIZING

Colleges of the Fenway
Massachusetts Tests for
Educator Licensure (MTEL)
1
rule
Information, Interactive Practice Exercises, and Practice Tests


Writing a Strong Summary Essay in Four Manageable Steps

Step One: Underline the Main Points and Circle Key Terms

Step Two: Note Main Points in the Margins of the Text

Step Three: Group Main Points into Sets

Step Four: Combine Sets of Key Points into Well-Organized Paragraphs

December 10, 2009 Posted by | READING, WRITING | , | Leave a comment

POWERFUL PARAGRAPHS

Here are some resources for fine-tuning paragraphs and persuasive essays.One good application of elaborating paragraphs is to use the skills for writing better introductions as. The MTEL has a site that breaks down the argument essay very well. Also A helpful powerpoint.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

December 10, 2009 Posted by | WRITING | , , , | Leave a comment

PIC LITS AND MORE

CHECK OUT GREAT SUMMARY
PIC LITS.COM

PicLit from PicLits.com
See the full PicLit at PicLits.com

October 7, 2009 Posted by | IDEAS, POETRY, WRITING | Leave a comment

ESSAY POWERPOINTS

ESSAY STEPS

5 Paragraph Essay

THE BING, THE BANG AND THE BONGO

September 26, 2009 Posted by | POWERPOINT, WRITING | , , | Leave a comment

The Trouble with Rubrics

The Trouble with Rubrics

By Alfie Kohn

Once upon a time I vaguely thought of assessment in dichotomous terms:  The old approach, which consisted mostly of letter grades, was crude and uninformative, while the new approach, which included things like portfolios and rubrics, was detailed and authentic.  Only much later did I look more carefully at the individual floats rolling by in the alternative assessment parade — and stop cheering.

For starters, I realized that it’s hardly sufficient to recommend a given approach on the basis of its being better than old-fashioned report cards.  By that criterion, just about anything would look good. I eventually came to understand that not all alternative assessments are authentic.  My growing doubts about rubrics in particular were prompted by the assumptions on which this technique rested and also the criteria by which they (and assessment itself) were typically judged.  These doubts were stoked not only by murmurs of dissent I heard from thoughtful educators but by the case made for this technique by its enthusiastic proponents.  For example, I read in one article that “rubrics make assessing student work quick and efficient, and they help teachers to justify to parents and others the grades that they assign to students.”[1] To which the only appropriate response is: Uh-oh.

Continue reading

September 22, 2009 Posted by | WRITING | Leave a comment